Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Summit on Conventional and Sustainable Energies Orlando, Florida, USA.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Mischa Morgera

MM Consulting & Associates, USA

Keynote: Commissioning for net zero energy management and challenges

Time : 09:30-10:05

OMICS International Sustainable Energies 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mischa Morgera photo
Biography:

Mischa Morgera is a Certified Qualified Commissioning Professional (QCxP) for new and existing facilities, Certified Sustainability Manager (CSM), LEED Green Associate (GA), Certified Construction Contract Administrator (CCCA); licensure in Florida as a Certified Mechanical Contractor (CMC), Building Plans Examiner (PX), and Mechanical Inspector (MI); and licensure as a registered Professional Engineer (PE) of Ontario, Canada. She has over 25 years of experience in Sustainable Energy Building Construction in both public and private sectors. She is trained in the USA and Canada in Building Construction Engineering and in the UK in Business Administration, she has demonstrated proven leadership within the building construction industry, delivering sustainable energy efficiency and commissioning of major construction projects in excess of $50M and providing successful project management for new and existing facilities ranging from $10K to $150M. An advisor on USGBC's Board of Governing Council, her sustainability directives have achieved LEED silver and LEED gold certifications in buildings over 250,000 SF

Abstract:

Commissioning for Net Zero Energy Management is important, due to stringent code requirements and standards, e.g., IECC 2015, ASHRAE 90.1 2016, IGCC, and USGBC LEED; rising costs of electricity; and the Federal Government Net Zero Mandate. Clients are requiring net zero energy for new and, in some cases, existing construction. Buildings are the largest energy consumer in the USA, consuming approximately 40% of primary energy, 72% of electricity, and 55% of natural gas. Commissioning for Net Zero Energy Management is generally consistent with an Energy Use Intensity (EUI) goal mindset, where the building is commissioned for performance. A portion of energy usage can typically be provided with sustainable energy technologies. This keynote will present the differences between traditional Commissioning and Commissioning for Net Zero Energy Management, discuss the challenges in its implementation, and present a number of case studies.

 

Keynote Forum

V Beschkov

Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria

Keynote: Sustainable energy production from natural water resources by sulfide driven fuel cell
OMICS International Sustainable Energies 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker V Beschkov photo
Biography:

V Beschkov, PhD, DSc has got his PhD and his DSc degree from the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. His present interests are chemical and biochemical processes for environment protection and utilization of renewable energy sources. He participated in 30 scientific projects and in 19 applied ones. The most important project he has been working on is “Hydrogen Production from Black Sea Water by Sulfide-Driven Fuel Cell”, financed by the FP7. He published over 200 scientific papers, monographs and chapters in selected issues. Over 1300 citations of his papers have been noted (h-index=20). 

Abstract:

Hydrogen sulfide is frequently present in natural waters, like mineral springs, but mostly it is found in marine water with low renewal rate. The Black Sea is the water pond with extremely high hydrogen sulfide content, estimated to some 4.6 Gt, thus increasing in time. The utilization of this enormous amount could be accomplished in different ways, but the most promising is its direct conversion into electricity. This result can be attained by sulfide driven fuel cell (SDFC), converting sulfide to sulfate thus releasing up to 26 GJ/t. This work presents experimental data in laboratory scale SDFC for sulfide conversion into sulfate, sulfite and polysulfide releasing different amounts of electric energy. Experiments are carried out at initial sulfide concentrations from 10 to 300 mg/l. Sulfate, sulfite and polysulfide ions are detected in the outlet solutions from the fuel cell. The quantitative results showed good agreement with the chemical analyses. Most of the results showed attained high efficiencies of the fuel cell, i.e. up to 80%. The next efforts will be dedicated to attainment of high current and power densities suitable for direct practical applications. The practical applications of this method could be extended to other purposes, like treatment of polluted water together with utilization as energy.

Keynote Forum

Michael K H Leung

City University of Hong Kong, China

Keynote: Functional nanomaterials for sustainable energy
OMICS International Sustainable Energies 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Michael K H Leung photo
Biography:

Michael K H Leung is a Professor and Associate Dean in the School of Energy and Environment at the City University of Hong Kong. He is also the Director of Ability R&D Energy Research Centre at CityU. His research interests include solar photocatalysis, fuel-cell electrochemistry and advanced refrigeration. He has published 130+ journal papers, 70+ conference papers, 15 books/book chapters, and 6 patents. He is listed as a highly cited scholar in Energy Science and Engineering by ShanghaiRanking and Elsevier.

 

Abstract:

Advanced energy conversion and storage technologies, including fuel cell, metal-air and metal-sulfur batteries, solar photovoltaics and photocatalysis, etc., are shaping the future of sustainable energy. The development of functional nanomaterials plays a crucial role as core driving force for the revolution of these technologies. Present active research efforts aim to achieve scientific breakthrough via (1) engineering intrinsic properties, such as bandgap, charge carrier mobility, charge and spin density distribution etc., and (2) increasing active sites, including morphology control, preferred crystalline facet control, increasing specific surface area, etc. In this presentation, the speaker will discuss the latest development and future trend of nano-photocatalysts and carbon-based electrode materials for various applications towards sustainable energy.

 

OMICS International Sustainable Energies 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Elias (Lee) Stefanakos photo
Biography:

Elias (Lee) Stefanakos is presently Professor of Electrical Engineering and Director of the Clean Energy Research Center (CERC), University of South Florida (USF), in Tampa, Florida. Up to August 2003 and for 13 years he was Chairman of the Department of Electrical Engineering at USF. He is Chief Editor of the Journal of Power and Energy Engineering (JPEE) and Associate Editor of the Journal of Solar Energy (Photovoltaics). He is co-editor of two handbooks (Solar Radiation and Hydrogen Energy), has published over 200 research papers in refereed journals and international conferences and has 15 patents in the areas of smart materials, renewable energy components and systems, hydrogen and fuel cells, and electric vehicles He has been a consultant to a number of companies and international organizations. CERC is an interdisciplinary center whose mission is the development of smart materials and clean energy systems with emphasis on technology development and technology transfer (http://cerc.eng.usf.edu/).

 

Abstract:

A sustainable energy future could be secured by the use of a mixture of renewable and conventional energy sources. The timeline for achieving such a secure and sustainable energy future is difficult to project, however, in the mix of these energies, solar power plants with energy storage will certainly play a very significant role. In this presentation, a brief overview of photovoltaic (PV) and concentrated solar thermal (CSP) power plants as well as energy storage will be given. A number of factors will determine the widespread utilization of solar power, such as available solar radiation (location) and cost. Electrochemical and thermal energy storage will play a big role in the process of mitigating the problem of solar energy intermittency. The present technologies, costs and projected costs of PV and CSP power plants and energy storage will be presented.

 

Keynote Forum

Keyou Yan

The Chinese University of Hong Kong, China

Keynote: New-generation photovoltaic technology based on hybrid materials
OMICS International Sustainable Energies 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Keyou Yan photo
Biography:

The next generation of solar cell seeks to enhance both efficiency and cost-effectiveness through the use of new materials and simple processes. Solution-processed and printable technologies, using semiconductor nanocrystals, organic molecules and hybrid materials, offer an attractive route towards achieving these grand goals. These technologies need to well understand the basic chemistry, surface and interface. This presentation is focused on the development of dye sentitized solar cell and perovskite solar cell using nanostructured materials and hybrid material. Colloidal quantum structure and plasmonic nanostructures et al are employed for multicolored, multifunctional, and next-generation photovoltaic devices that go beyond the traditional material and solar cells. The solution and coordination chemistry will be in detail invesitigated to reduce the efficiency-cost-stability gap towards commecialization.

 

Abstract:

Keyou Yan is research assistant professor in The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK). He received Ph.D. in 2013 from The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST). After postdoc research, he joined the Department of Electronic Engineering as faculty in CUHK in July 2016. He worked on low-cost new-generation photovoltaic technology using nanostructure and hybrid material in the past years. Prof Yan has published 50+ refereed journal papers and had total citations of ~3000 , including Nature Communications, JACS, Advanced Functional Materials et al. He is a member of ACS.

 

 

OMICS International Sustainable Energies 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Prasanta Kumar Biswas photo
Biography:

Prasanta Kumar Biswas has done his PhD, Calcutta University, joined CSIR-CGCRI as a Scientist in 1984 and initiated developmental work on soft chemistry based thin films on glass for optics and nanostructured semiconductors. He has about 150 publications, six Indian patents and led international collaborative projects with Germany, France, USA, Japan and Slovenia. He retired in 2012 as a Chief Scientist. He was then in IIT Roorkee as an Honorary Fellow. Currently, he is Honorary Visiting Professor of Barasat College, WBSU. He is the recipient of MRSI Medal award from Material Research Society of India and the elected Fellow, FAScT of WAST, India.

 

Abstract:

Solar radiation (~0.2–2.5 µm) on earth surface involves illumination and heat generation as it covers the electromagnetic waves of visible and near-IR region. The Air Mass (AM) spectrum of solar radiation shows irradiance decreases with the increase in tilted angle. Hence, designing of window glass system should be made in such a manner that solar radiation should enter the room at high angle of incidence highlighting reasonable illumination (100–300 lux) and suitable thermal comfort. To remove the unwanted heat absorption by glass, a suitable layer of low thermal emissivity with heat reflection property should be deposited onto the window glass. On the basis of this idea a low-e material, indium antimony oxide (IAO) (In: Sb=97:07), a wide band gap semiconductor (band gap, ~3.5 eV) has been chosen and deposited on to window glass of dimensions, 500 mm x 500 mm by soft chemistry method. The developed film is transparent in the visible and electrically conducting with >25% reflection in the Mid-IR region. The performance of the film as window glass fenestration in day time is characterized by evaluating direct solar optical properties from the spectral data measured at different angles of incidence by UV–VIS–NIR spectroscopy. Major work was executed at CSIR-CGCRI, India in collaboration with the School of Energy Studies, Jadavpur University, and Kolkata, India. The outcome of the work is prospective and this will be discussed in the talk.

 

  • Renewable Energy Resources |Electromagnetic and electrostatic storage |Electric Power Systems | Wind Energy |Nuclear Energy |Petroleum Engineering|Biofuels & Biodiesels |Sustainability Energy in Science
Speaker

Chair

Jayanta S Kapat

University of Central Florida, USA

Session Introduction

Jonathan Aaron Franco

California State Polytechnic University, USA

Title: AIPG - aeroelasticy induced power generation

Time : 14:05-14:25

Speaker
Biography:

Jonathan Aaron Franco is currently a senior Aerospace Engineering student at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. He is the Project Manager of this multi-disciplinary senior project including three Electrical Engineering teams. He has aided the project as an Underclassmen Assistant for the past four academic quarters prior to achieving senior standing.

 

 

Abstract:

Aeroelasticy Induced Power Generation: This is a multi-disciplinary undergraduate research project consisting of one Aerosapce Engineering team and three Electrical Engineering teams. The ultimate goal for this multi-year project is to fly a 3-D printed UAV electric propulsion aircraft that generates power from multiple environtemental sources to facilitate a new world record for the longest flight time. Regenerative braking is currently being used in the automotive industry to charge hybrid vehicle batteries; the goal of this project is to research and develop new regenerative power mechanisms for the Aerospace industry. The system is designed to generate electrical power from multiple sources; oscillatory vibrations of a flexible wing due to aeroelastic flutter and gust response exciting motor generators, piezoelectric devices, with additional solar power generation. Light weight power storage devices are being developed including 3-D printed batteries and graphine super-capacitors. The motor generation mechanisms are stored in a pod attached to the bottom of the wing and the piezos are attached to the wing spar. A long term goal of the project is to enable simultaneous 3-D printing of the power generation and storage devices within a 3-D printed composite structural wing. The manufacturing of the composite 3D printed wing and power storage devices are currently under development. These generation and storage mechanisms are interfaced with a power management circuit capable of collecting electrical power inputs from multiple power sources, charging the batteries to drive the electric motor propeller.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Jay Kapat is currently the Pegasus Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Central Florida (UCF). He received his doctoral degree in Mechanical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and has been at UCF since 1997. Since 2012, he has been the founding director of the Center for Advanced Turbomachinery and Energy Research (CATER) at UCF. He has supervised and graduated 20 doctoral students, most of whom are currently at various OEM’s such as Siemens Energy and Mitsubishi. He has over 200 journal and peer-reviewed conference publications.

 

Abstract:

Steady penetration of solar and wind energy into US electric generation has brought significant changes to the industry. This has happened at a time when natural gas remains abundant and inexpensive. In fact, gas turbines running on natural gas are quite often touted as renewable-enabler as their fast start-up characteristics make them ideal for meeting grid demands when generation from solar and wind energies fall off. The combination of enhanced electric grid and back-up power generation would work nicely, except that carbon dioxide would still be emitted while using the back-up power generation. Of course, that can change when affordable, grid-scale battery storage is available. This presentation covers two different power production scenarios, where direct solar electricity generation can be complemented by alternative modes of power generation such that no carbon dioxide gets released to the atmosphere even when natural gas is used to complement the renewable generation. The first scenario covers solar thermal power generation hybridized with super-critical carbon dioxide (sCO2) power cycle with oxy-combustion of natural gas. Here, carbon dioxide will be naturally captured even when natural gas is used as the heat source, and in addition, water will be produced in the oxy-combustion process that will be available for consumption. The second scenario involves solar PV array to be complemented by a salinity-gradient-solar-pond (SGSP) that acts as a thermal storage to store the solar energy when available. When sun is not shining, stored thermal energy is converted to electricity through an Organic Rankine Cycle.

 

Speaker
Biography:

My name is Abdullatif Hakim and I am a graduate Electrical Engineering student at the University of South Florida with emphasis on power systems. I have five years of experience at the Jazan power plant. I’ve completed my bachelor’s degree in 2016 at Gannon University, PA and my master’s degree in 2017 at University of South Florida, FL. I'm in the Ph.D. program at University of South Florida in Electrical Engineering

Abstract:

Reduced-order beholder for rotor flux estimation of generalization motor s are considered. The “electric current” model and “voltage” model are obtained as special cases. It is shown that the flux dynamics variant a nonlinear closed-loop scheme when the flux estimate is used for study orientation course. The beholder increase survival of the fittest is extremely critical for goodness behavior of this system. A human body work is developed, in which the dimension of any gain selection easily can be assessed. Four candidates gain selections are considered, two of which proceeds schemes that do not use the rotor speed in their equations (inherently sensor less schemes). It is also shown that for any gain selection, an equivalent synchronous-frame implementation (i.e., indirect field orientation) always exists. Forefinger Terms—Field orientation, flux estimation, generalization motor, senseless control. Induction machines (IMs), unlike synchronous machines, do not allow the flux position to be easily measured. For vector control, one must resort to flux estimation. The “current” model (CM) and “voltage” model (VM) are the traditional solutions, and their benefits and drawbacks are well known. (Due to their respective parameter sensitivities, they are useful at low and nominal speeds, respectively.) Various observers for flux estimation were analyzed in the pioneering work by Verghese and Sanders. Over the years, several other have been presented, many of which also include speed estimation.

Biography:

Rahwa Gebre Tesfahuney is working as an assistant professor in institute of Environment, Gender and Development Studies in Mekelle University, Ethiopia. She did her MSc in consumers Studies-Marketing and Consumer Behavior in Wageningen University.

 

Abstract:

Biogas has micro and macro benefits which require sound investigation. Hence, this study was to assess costs and benefits of biogas at household level in three Weredas of Tigray in which the project is widely adopted. The study used both primary via questionnaire and secondary data from literatures. The sample size included 150 households selected via purposive sampling. The collected data were analyzed using cross tab with phi and Cramer’s value and spear man rho’s correlation. Most of the Female household heads that live in rural areas with no access to electricity and other modern alternative sources of energy are using Biogas. The size of digester of the biogas ranges from 6 meter cubic to 8 meter cubic. 6 meter cubic is common at household level. The total construction costs of biogas ranges from ETB 12,300 to 14,000 out of which only ETB 2,300 to 3,500 is covered by the users and remaining is covered by Government Organizations and NGOs. Biogas is used for lighting; baking; Boiling; cooking; and coffee making activities at household level. Location, owing cattle, feeding way of cattle, source of income and subsidy are main decision elements for adoption of biogas. Sustainable waste management, saving cooking and cleaning time, fertilizer production, saving kerosene and labor are benefits which differ as per size of digester of biogas. The benefiting capacity increases as size of digester of the biogas increases. The Biogas users are obtaining benefits while facing problems of biogas and its slurry. All concerned bodies need to give attention to female household heads in rural areas with regard to Biogas plants Development as this has a strong linkage with such part of the community and particularly the Government and NGOs need to adjust their incentives and interest rate of their loan including the Microfinance institutions to cover portion of Biogas initial cost as per the capacity and demand of the users. All stakeholders of Biogas need to focus on the decision elements and to recognize the Benefits of Biogas that differ as per the size of digester of the biogas so that to act accordingly.

 

Biography:

Belqasem Aljafari has completed his MS from Northern Illinois University School of Engineering. He is pursuing his education by studying currently the PhD degree school of engineering.

 

Abstract:

There has been concern over the commercially existing energy storage technologies over their capacities and efficiency. Supercapacitors are now being viewed as one of the most efficient energy technology alternatives. In fact, research engineers are now focusing on ways and means to boost its performance further hence it is being fortified with multi-walled carbon-based electrodes to increase its performance. This paper considers the emerging technologies and how it is shaping up the performance of electrochemical supercapacitors. Many research scientists and engineers have concentrated on the techniques and methodologies of ensuring that fortification of the supercapacitor using the multi-walled carbon nanotube material bears fruit. The investigation of correlation in characteristics between a purely made supercapacitor with ordinary carbon as a base material and that in which the multi-walled carbon nanotubes are embedded was carried out. The results obtained were positive as there was a marked improvement in the capacitive performance of the fortified supercapacitor. The carbon nanotubes provided a more significant electrode potential hence attracting more ions. In fact, the capacitance, due to this composition, jumped from four to 139F/g. Further agree that the desirable capacitive qualities in carbon nanotubes could be attributed to the fact they have higher specific surface area, greater thermal and electrical conductivity, and lower mass.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Mutanga Shingirirai Savious is a well-established researcher in the fields of multi-disciplinary research, applied GIS, remote sensing and systems analysis. Currently, he is working as a research specialist at the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC), under the Africa Institute of South Africa’s (AISA) Science and Technology Programme. He holds a PhD in Industrial Systems Engineering from the University of Pretoria, South Africa. He holds an MSc in Geo-Information Science and Earth observation for environmental modelling and management, obtained from a consortium of four universities (Southampton (UK), Lund (Sweden), Warsaw (Poland) and ITC (Netherlands)) and an Honors degree in Geography and Environmental Science from Midlands University, in Zimbabwe.

 

Abstract:

Current global energy systems have proven unsustainable amid effects of the cumulative greenhouse emissions and climate change. The drive towards a low carbon future has precipitated the consideration of alternative energy sources. This paper captures the complex dimensions of scaling up energy supply with specific reference to bio-derived energy production. Within this sector sugar cane, grown widely in African countries, is known to be one of the most productive species in terms of its conversion of solar energy to chemical potential energy. However the supply of feedstock is limited to the harvest or crop season. More-so the sugarcane industry is faced a plethora of threats and challenges. The spatial system dynamics model (SSDM) of sugarcane industrial ecosystem presented in this paper is towards an integrated approach to simulate a bio refinery system suggesting directions for bagasse and trash-derived electricity generation. The model unpacks the complexity in bio-derived energy generation across the conversion pathways of the system from land use change, sugarcane production, and harvesting and electricity production amid a plethora of challenges in the system. Input data for land use and sugarcane production in the model were derived from remote sensing and spatial analysis. Simulated and validated results indicate that the alternative scenario of combined bagasse and trash with enhanced mechanisation and technology efficiency provides the highest efficiency in terms of electricity generation and emission avoidance compared to the business as usual or base case scenario. The applied SSDM demonstrates that modelling of feedback-based complex dynamic processes in time and space provide better insights crucial for decision making. This model provides a foundation for the broader study for cost benefit analysis of electricity production from a sugarcane industrial ecosystem.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Richard Ohene Asiedu holds a PhD (construction management) from Bauhaus University, a Master’s Degree in Infrastructure Planning from the University of Stuttgart and Bachelor’s Degree in Building Technology from the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology. He has over ten years of experience in the Ghanaian Construction Industry with specialty in Construction Management and Quantity Surveying. He is a Senior Lecturer at the Koforidua Technical University and an Associate Member of the Ghana Institution of Surveyors. He can presently refer to a list of journal and conference papers

Abstract:

Cost overrun of projects has been a key concern for all stakeholders of projects for many decades now. However, the empirical evidence of the causes seem not be clear due to the silo approach in understanding the causes of project cost overrun. This study seeks to take the debate a step forward by providing an understanding of the causes of project cost overrun from a system’s perspective, especially from a less researched environment. Data was collected and analyzed from 131 respondents who were mainly involved in construction works in public procurement entities in Ghana. A two-staged approach was employed in collecting data from the respondents. The first stage involved an interview session with key informants in the construction industry in Ghana to ascertain the detailed causes of cost overrun of construction projects. The second stage focused on the validation of these detailed factors by a wider stakeholder group through questionnaires. Factor analysis was employed to consolidate these detailed factors into some main causes of project cost overrun. The results show that there are primarily four major causes of most public sector projects cost overrun. These four major causes of cost overruns are poor contract planning and supervision; change orders; lack of competence of the project team and lack of effective coordination among the contracting parties. The study sheds light on areas where public sector project planners and managers should focus on in order to alleviate projects cost overrun. In other words, it serves as a decision support system for planners and managers of public sector projects in effectively managing the challenge of projects cost overrun. The study provides more insights as to the critical factors that underpin public sector projects cost overrun and more importantly does so from a system’s perspective

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Anitha Subburaj is an Assistant Professor at West Texas A&M University. She received her Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in 2014 from Texas Tech University, where she worked as a Research Assistant on the project, “Advanced Battery Modeling and Evaluation”. She received her ME degree from Anna University, India in 2007. She held a position as Assistant Professor, at Kumaraguru College of Technology, India for three years. Her areas of research interests are renewable energy, control systems, battery energy storage system, and battery connected to grid applications. She has published several technical papers in reputed journals

Abstract:

With the rapid growth of battery technologies in renewable energy production, it is essential to understand the battery type and the model, to achieve a coordinated control. The research provides the grid-connected battery modeling that integrates wind. The advanced battery model utilizes the electrical equivalent (dual polarization) model for the analysis. The research involves deploying a 1 MWh energy storage system (at Reese Technology Center in Lubbock, Texas) to understand the renewable energy sources and load management, including battery applications such as ramp control, frequency response, voltage response, emergency backup and peak load leveling, when connected to the grid. In order to develop the test bed of the grid-connected battery project at Reese, the research provides the simulation results using PSCAD software on discharge and charge characteristics of the 1 MWh Lithium Manganese Oxide battery under transient fault conditions when it is tied to the grid for wind integration. Initially vector control technique was used to control the current flow and the results were validated using the experimental data. Later an emerging technique on model predictive control (for three phase bi-directional converter to integrate a battery system with the grid) was developed to compare its performance with the vector controller. The model predictive control technique is analyzed to integrate the 1MWh battery system in PSCAD simulation environment for both steady state and fault scenarios. The simulation results show the effectiveness of model predictive control technology for battery system integration with the grid.

 

Philip W. T. Pong

The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Title: Smart city with clean energy enabled by magnetic sensing

Time : 17:05-17:25

Speaker
Biography:

Philip W. T. Pong is a chartered physicist, a chartered electrical engineer, a chartered energy engineer, and a registered professional engineer. He is working on magnetoresistive magnetic field sensors, smart grid, and smart living in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering (EEE) at the University of Hong Kong (HKU). He received a B.Eng. in EEE of HKU in 2002 with 1st class honours. He obtained his PhD in Engineering from the University of Cambridge in 2005. After working as a postdoctoral researcher in the Magnetic Materials Group at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for three years, he joined the HKU Faculty of Engineering where he is now an associate professor. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining and also a Fellow of the NANOSMAT Society. He has published over 200 technical papers with over 100 SCI publications

Abstract:

A smart city is a sustainable urban center that interconnects and improves quality of life for its inhabitants which are ever increasing due to the rapid urbanization particularly in Asia. A smart city is composed of a number of components including smart buildings, smart grid, smart energy and smart transportation. Many of these components are supporting clean energy which is a promising solution to the threatening environmental problems such as pollution, carbon dioxide emission and ozone layer depletion. On the other hand, the integration and penetration of clean energy into smart cities poses challenges to the power systems that require sophisticated sensing in order to maintain power stability. Sensing is a major framework of a smart city as it gathers vital data and statistics to ensure the smooth operation of the city. Most of the smart city applications are created with the building blocks of sensors. Magnetic, being one of the six major sensor energy forms, plays an important technical role in both smart city and clean energy. Therefore smart city, clean energy and magnetic sensing form a trilateral relation that is shaping the current status as well as future prospect of smart living. In this talk we will discuss how magnetic sensing can be implemented to enable smart city with clean energy. We will look at the latest development of applications of magnetic sensors in smart city and clean energy. An overview picture of the technology trend will be presented to illustrate the contribution of magnetic sensing to sustainability and smart future.