Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Summit on Conventional and Sustainable Energies Orlando, Florida, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Panos M Pardalos

University of Florida, USA

Keynote: Optimization, modeling, and data sciences for sustainable energy systems

Time : 09:50-10:25

OMICS International Sustainable Energies 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Panos M Pardalos photo
Biography:

Panos M Pardalos serves as distinguished Professor of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the University of Florida. Additionally, he is the Paul and Heidi Brown Preeminent Professor of Industrial and Systems Engineering. He is also the Director of the Center for Applied Optimization. He is a world leading expert in global and combinatorial optimization. His recent research interests include energy systems, network design problems, optimization in telecommunications, e-commerce,data mining, biomedical applications, and massive computing.

Abstract:

For decades, power systems have been playing an important role in humanity. Industrialization has made energy consumption an inevitable part of daily life. Due to our dependence on fuel sources and our large demand for energy, power systems have become interdependent networks rather than remaining independent energy producers. This talk will focus on the problems arising in energy systems as well as recent advances in optimization, modeling, and data sciences techniques to address these problems. Among the topics to be discussed are emission constrained hydrothermal scheduling, electricity and gas networks expansion, as well as reliability analysis of power grid.

Keynote Forum

Ramesh K Agarwal

Washington University, USA

Keynote: Aerodynamic optimization of wind turbine blades and wind energy

Time : 10:25-11:00

OMICS International Sustainable Energies 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ramesh K Agarwal photo
Biography:

Ramesh Agarwal has received his PhD from Stanford University in 1975 and Post-doctoral training at NASA Ames Research Center in 1976. From 1976 to 1994,
he was the Program Director and McDonnell Douglas Fellow at McDonnell Douglas Research Laboratories in St. Louis. From 1994 to 2001, he was the Sam Bloomfield Distinguished Professor and Executive Director of National Institute for Aviation Research at Wichita State University in Wichita, KS. He is currently the William Palm Professor of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis. He is the author/co-author of nearly 250 archival papers and over 500 conference papers. He is on the editorial board of 20+ journals. He is a Fellow of 18 societies including AIAA, ASME, ASEE, SAE, IEEE, APS, and AAAS among others. He is the recipient of many honors and awards.

Abstract:

Wind has been used as a source of power by human society centuries before the dawn of industrial revolution. Since the beginning of the industrial age, the fossil fuels have dominated as a source of energy. Only in last couple of decade or so, because of concerns about global warming, there has been increased emphasis on using wind as a source of clean, renewable and sustainable energy source. This talk will describe the potential of wind as an important source of energy since it is available around the globe at sufficient velocities to generate significant amount of power. It is well established that the power generated by a Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) is a function of the number of blades B, the tip speed ratio λ (blade tip speed/wind free stream velocity) and the lift to drag ratio (CL/CD) of the airfoil sections of the blade. The airfoil sections used in HAWT are generally thick airfoils such as the S, DU, FX, Flat-back and NACA 6-series of airfoils. These airfoils vary in (CL /CD) for a given B and λ, and therefore the power generated by HAWT for different blade airfoil sections will vary. This lecture will show the effect of different airfoil sections on HAWT performance using the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory. The relatively thick airfoils DU 91-W2-250, FX 66-S196-V1, NACA 64421, and Flat-back series of airfoils (FB-3500-0050, FB-3500-0875, and FB-3500-1750), both original and optimized, are considered and their performance is compared with S809 airfoil used in NREL Phase II and III wind turbines; the lift and drag coefficient data for these airfoils sections are available.The output power of the turbine is calculated using these airfoil section blades for a given B and λ and is compared with the original NREL Phase II and Phase III turbines using S809 airfoil section. It is shown that by a suitable choice of airfoil section of HAWT blade, the power generated by the turbine can be significantly increased. Calculations are presented both for uniform wind velocity and variable wind velocity by including the dynamic inflow. We also consider the wind farm layout optimization problem using a genetic algorithm. Both the Horizontal–Axis Wind Turbines (HAWT) and Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT) of various sizes in diameter and height are considered. The goal of the optimization problem is to optimally position the turbines within the wind farm such that the wake effects are minimized, and the power production is maximized.The reasonably accurate modeling of the turbine wake is critical in determination of the optimal layout of the turbines and the power generated. For HAWT, two wake models are considered; both are found to give similar answers. For VAWT, a very  simple wake model is employed. In addition, the technologies related to windmill control will be briefly discussed. The issue of intermittency of wind generated power and its integration into the grid will be discussed. The environmental concerns and cost-effectiveness issues will also be addressed. 

OMICS International Sustainable Energies 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Donald L Rockwood photo
Biography:

Donald L Rockwood is President of Florida FGT LLC, has over 35 years of experience on the development and use of Eucalyptus amplifolia, E grand is Corymbia torelliana, Populus deltoides, cypress, and slash pine hybrids in Florida and elsewhere. Also Professor Emeritus at the School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, he is actively involved with the genetic improvement of several Short Rotation Woody Crop (SRWC) species, including the commercial release of E grandis cultivars, and with the development and utilization of SRWC systems using these species.

 

Abstract:

Sustainably grown eucalypts have numerous potential applications. Native to Australia but established as exotic short-rotation plantations in tropical, subtropical, and even temperate regions of Africa, South America, Asia, Australia, Europe, and North America for a variety of timber products, eucalypts are the world’s most valuable and widely planted hardwoods (18 million ha in 90 countries). India and Brazil have over 8.0 and 3.0 million ha of plantations, respectively. Using experience in Florida USA and similar locations, we describe eucalypts potential for maximizing productivity as short rotation woody crops, document their current energy applications, and assess their potential as short-term and likely long-term energy and related products as well as medically related products. Many conversion technologies are well understood, and several are being developed. Many products currently derived from petrochemicals can be produced from Eucalyptus biomass. Eucalyptus bio products, which may be classified as naturally occurring, generated by biochemical processes, or as the result of thermochemical processes, have a broad and exciting range of applications. Increased biomass productivity and quality, prospects for carbon trading, distributed energy systems and hydrogen, multiple products from bio refining, and government incentives should foster the use of fast growing eucalyptus.

 

OMICS International Sustainable Energies 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sandra Jo Garren photo
Biography:

Sandra Jo Garren is the Director of Sustainability Research at the National Center for Sub-urban Studies at Hofstra University. She is also the Director of Sustainability Studies and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geology, Environment, and Sustainability at Hofstra University. She completed her Doctorate in Geography and Environmental Science & Policy Program in the Department of Geosciences at the University of South Florida, Tampa in May 2014. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Earth Science/Geology and a Master’s degree in Teaching. In total, she has more than 25 years of experience in both academic and environmental sustainability fields as a Principal Investigator, Project Manager and Technical Expert. She has conducted numerous scientific investigations related to sustainability, greenhouse gas accounting, energy policy, climate change policy, water management and environmental regulation. Her research is currently focused on sustainability, energy policy, climate policy, and water management issues globally, nationally, and sub-nationally with a focus on applied science and policy that solve problems and find solutions to the negative impacts of climate change and other environmental challenges. She currently teaches courses in sustainable development, sustainability theory, sustainable energy, and geospatial applications in sustainability. She is currently co-authoring two sustainability case study books in the fall 2017.

 

Abstract:

Sustainability is a relatively new field which has been growing since 1987. That is when the United Nation’s published the Brundtland Report which officially defined sustainable development as development that meets the current generation’s needs without compromising future generations. Since then, the field has grown tremendously. Fast forward to 2012 when the United Nations advanced 17 sustainable development goals (SDGs) SDG 7 focuses on energy, specifically to “ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all.” Some nations are achieving this SDG; however, there are still more than one billion people without electricity. Fossil fuels could provide modern energy but at the expense of the environment (i.e., air and water pollution and greenhouse gas emissions that drives climate change). And currently, renewable energy represents less than 20 percent of the world’s total energy production. This dynamic set up one of the greatest big picture challenges of our time, namely, how to provide modern energy for all while protecting the environment. There are examples of nations that are making progress, but they are still in the minority. For example, both Costa Rica and Iceland source the majority of their energy from hydropower and geothermal. At the sub-national scale, regions and cities are following suite. For example, in 2014 Burlington, Vermont became the first American city to run entirely on renewable electricity. However, challenges remain in the transition to renewable energy. This talk will review the state of renewable energy policy around the world both nationally and sub-nationally and provide case studies of exemplary performance in renewable energy policy.

 

OMICS International Sustainable Energies 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Nevenka R Elezovic photo
Biography:

Nevenka R Elezovic has completed her PhD in 2005, from University of Belgrade. She is currently working as a Research Professor at the Institute for Multidisciplinary Research. Since 2013, she is serving as Representative of Serbia and member of the European Board in European Academy of Surface Technology- http://www.east-site.net. She has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as a reviewer for: Energy and Environmental Science, Applied Materials and Interfaces, Journal of Materials Chemistry A, Electrochimica Acta, Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, RSC Advances, PCCP and Chemical Communications.

 

Abstract:

Platinum based nanoparticles on high surface area carbon (commercially named Vulcan XC 72 or Ketjen Black) are state of the art materials for low temperature fuel cells application – high efficiency environmental friendly power sources. These catalysts have acceptable high activity for commercial use; however the stability is still big challenge to overcome, to achieve proper durability and long-life costs acceptable for practical purpose. The other big challenge is high oxygen reduction overpotential and its slow kinetics causing unacceptable power loss. Namely, we have synthesized Pt based nano catalysts on different metal oxide based supports (Ti, Sn, W based oxides) and characterized its activity and stability for oxygen reduction reaction. The supports were doped by several percent of Nb and Ru (5-10%) to achieve sufficient conductivity. The synthesized nanocatlysts were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM), Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS), X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), as well as by electrochemical techniques and Accelerated Stability Testing. The results confirmed very high activity and stability, if compared to commercial Vulcan XC 72 supported catalysts with the same Pt loading.

 

OMICS International Sustainable Energies 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Hashem Nehrir photo
Biography:

Hashem Nehrir has over 40 years of university teaching and research experience. He is a Professor at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Montana State University (MSU). His research encompasses modeling, control, and power management of alternative energy power generation systems, load control (demand response) and application of artificial intelligence for micro grid power management for resiliency and self-healing of power systems. He is Life Fellow of IEEE, the 2010 recipient of MSU’s Wiley Faculty Award for Meritorious Research, the 2016 recipient of IEEE Power and Energy Society (PES) Ramakumar Family Renewable Energy Excellence Award, and the current Vice Chair of the Renewable Energy Technologies Subcommittee of IEEE-PES. He has lectured on his research and educational activities in ten countries around the globe.

 

Abstract:

It is expected that demand for electricity will increase rapidly with population growth around the globe in the foreseeable future. The increase in demand dictates the need for rapid increase in generation capacity, much of which is expected to be in the form of emission -free renewable energy power generation, including the highly heterogeneous energy sources such as wind and solar. We have already seen the growth of such power generation in the past decade. This presentation evaluates the potential of several different renewable energy resources with a focus on the potential energy of sun for solar Photovoltaic and solar heat for power generation and for hydrogen production. The opportunities and challenges associated with the use of sustainable, but variable renewable energy power generation sources and the role of energy storage and demand response in mitigating their variability in grid-tied and off-grid (islanded) applications will be discussed. Intelligent power management of multisource micro grids for reduced emission, improved reliability and resiliency, and a vision for a future renewable-energy-based Hydrogen-economy society will also be presented.

 

 

  • Renewable Energy Resources |Sustainability Energy in Science |Sustainable Energy in transportation |Solar Power |Biomass Energy |Hydroelectricity |Wind Energy |Petroleum Engineering |Geothermal Energy |Energy Conservation | Fossil Fuel
Speaker

Chair

Akram Abu-aisheh,

University of Hartford, USA

Session Introduction

Abdelrahman (Abdel) Karrar

The University of Tennesse, USA

Title: Voltage stability indicators, where are we?

Time : 14:30-14:50

Speaker
Biography:

Abdelrahman A. Karrar, PhD, IEEE Senior member.  Associate Professor at the Electrical Engineering Department, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Received the B.Sc. and M.Sc degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Khartoum, Sudan, 1985 and 1989, and the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from Loughborough University, UK, 1992. He also served as head of Electrical Engineering department at the University of Khartoum and a consultant for the National Electricity Corporation, Sudan. His research interests include power systems stability and control, in particular voltage stability and related areas. Additionally he is interested in power system stabilizers, power system PMU’s for smart relaying, and his expertise generally covers power systems operation, and power systems modelling and simulation

 

Abstract:

Voltage stability assessment for electrical grids has had a long history. Researches have tackled the problem over more than three decades; yet accurate and reliable predictors still defy the power industry. Phil Harris, PJM President and CEO famously said, “Voltage collapse is still the biggest single threat to the transmission system. It’s what keeps me awake at night.” The increase in automation and wide area measurements have produced an improvement in following the progress of the network into potential proximity to voltage collapse, but many questions remain unanswered. Proper load behavior and modeling is a formidable problem, understanding reactive resource limitations and behavior under stressed conditions is another, but the main obstacle remains proper topology processing and modeling of the network under potential voltage collapse conditions. A contingency leading to a voltage emergency situation would have to be captured in a time-frame that is fast enough to avoid deterioration into an irreversible collapse, yet which gives opportunity to carry out the necessary calculations and state estimations. Two types of modeling approaches are discussed – both based on PMU measurements and status indicators; simplified Thévenin based models, which typically require tracking and time displaced measurements to improve the model and obtain more degrees of freedom, and single-shot measurements which require more network model complexity and assistance from topology processing algorithms. The problem is not unique to inter-area high voltage networks and has found increased interest and discussion in the context of microgrids and isolated distribution networks with distributed generation components

Speaker
Biography:

Bjørn Kvamme obtained his MSc in Chemical Engineering (1981) and PhD in Chemical Engineering (1984) from the Norwegian University of Technology and Natural Sciences. After a short period with SINTEF and two years at Bergen University College, he was appointed as full Professor in 1987 and started education of MSc and PhD in Process Technology in Telemark. He is appointed as a Professor in Gas Processing at the Department of Physics, University of Bergen in March 2000. He is the author/co-author of 445 publications during last 15 years, of which 154 are in good international scientific journals. He has 2526 citations as per Feb 1, 2018, and has presented numerous papers at international conferences

Abstract:

Worldwide there are huge amounts of methane trapped in water as hydrate. These ice-like hydrate crystals contains up to 14% methane in a highly concentrated form. Unlike conventional oil and gas, hydrates are spread all over the world in permafrost region or deep offshore sediments. Many countries depend on import of fossil fuel and in many cases on various qualities of contaminating coal. Simple and inexpensive ways to produce these hydrates are available and in this work we demonstrate by state of the art reservoir modeling of some of these production methods. This includes pressure reduction as well as replacement of CH4 hydrate by CO2 hydrate. The latter option is discussed in more details since it represents an interesting concept for CO2 utilization and safe long terms storage of CO2. Injection of pure CO2 in natural gas hydrates involves low permeability and rapid formation of new hydrate than can block the sediments. Various ways to modify the concept by addition of other gases as well as environmentally friendly surfactants are discussed. Results from reservoir simulations related to real hydrate reservoirs are presented. These hydrate reservoirs span the range from shallow hydrate reservoir in the Barents Sea to very deep reservoirs offshore Taiwan.

 

Biography:

Y. S. Mok received the B.S. degree in chemical engineering from Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea, in 1989, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejon, Korea, in 1991 and 1994, respectively. He has been with the Department of Chemical Engineering, Jeju National University, Korea, since 2000. He has studied applications of non-thermal plasma to pollution (air/water) control, energy production and material syntheses, and he is widening his plasma research horizon to meet various industrial needs, including plasma-mediated hydrophobic coating of powdery materials, sterilization of microorganisms, heterogeneous catalyst preparation, etc.
 

Abstract:

Uniform nanosheet and nanoflower NiMoO4 structures have successfully been grown on γ-Al2O3 catalyst support using solvothermal method. The NiMoO4 structure could be controlled by varying the catalyst preparation temperature and precursor concentration. The conversion of propane and carbon dioxide into synthesis gas (CO+H2) was performed in an atmospheric-pressure plasma reactor packed with the NiMoO4/γ-Al2O3 catalysts at different temperature. The plasma substantially enhanced the propane and carbon dioxide conversion and increased the hydrogen yield. The nano-structured catalysts exhibited good catalytic activity and selectivity for the strongly endothermic dry reforming, and were chemically stable, resulting in enhanced resistance to coke formation and sintering. Notably, the catalytic activity of the NiMoO4/γ-Al2O3 led to stoichiometric reaction and negligible byproducts. The post-characterization of the used catalysts were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, temperature programmed oxidation, and Raman spectroscopy, which confirmed the less carbon formation and no structural deformation after the reforming reactions.

 

Zeynep Zaimoglu

Cukurova University, Turkey

Title: Is the environment paying the price for renewable biofuels?

Time : 15:30-15:50

Speaker
Biography:

Zeynep Zaimoglu, earned her PhD in the field of Agricultural Structures and İrrigation at Cukurova University, Adana, Turkey. She has published , in English and Turkish languages, more than 40 international and national articles as well as two educational textbooks. Her expertise includes watershed management, water resources development, constructed wetlands and water treatment in constructed wetlands, soil and ground water pollution and renewable energy and climate change issues.

She is an ERA-NET on Sustainable Animal Production evaluation committee.  She is currently Professor at Cukurova University since 2013 and engaged extensively in teaching and leading research projects.

 

Abstract:

Current energy policies address environmental issues including environmentally friendly technologies to increase energy supplies, usage of sustainable energy and encourage cleaner, more efficient energy use, with special attention to air pollution, greenhouse effect, global warming, and climate change. The biofuel policy aims to promote the use of fuels made from biomass, as well as other renewable fuels in transport and to produce electricity. Although biofuels do not have the potential to overcome the escalating oil problem, for some people it is the forerunner of a new and environment-friendly life style. This apprehension is partly true because, like everything else, biofuels have their advantages and disadvantages. Therefore, before presenting new policies regarding biofuels, their effects should be meticulously and carefully examined. Biofuels have negative effects on food safety, in two ways. First and the most important of these effects is biofuel sector’s high demand of agricultural produce, which would result in shortage of global food supply. Secondly, it is understood that biofuel sector’s agricultural produce demand play an important role in the rise of food prices, and it poses a threat to food availability and accessibility. Concerning biofuel and agricultural environment interaction, increased land usage and intense agricultural production of biofuels cause soil erosion and pollution. While increased land usage and intense agricultural production causes the organic and inorganic components to be depleted in the soil and the minerals become deficient, agricultural processes that use fertilizers, pesticides and similar chemicals cause the soil to be polluted faster. According to the data acquired, more than 20 million hectares of agricultural land worldwide is marked as areas for biofuel raw material production. This results in additional land use and intensive agricultural production, which also has negative effects on soil quality. Moreover, agricultural production needs water. Water is an essential part of agricultural production, and as an environmental concern, it faces depletion. Additional agricultural processes to produce especially sugar cane, sugar beet, palm oil and corn for biofuel production, which consume more water compared to other agricultural processes, result in excessive amount of water consumption, which will result in water scarcity. Additionally, in the process of biofuel production, agricultural products are washed and dried using vapor, which also results in excessive amount of water requirement, which also results in water scarcity problem to deepen.

 

Akram Abu-aisheh

University of Hartford, USA

Title: Hybrid solar/wind micro-grid systems

Time : 15:50-16:10

Speaker
Biography:

Akram Abu-aisheh is an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Hartford. He is a Senior IEEE Member, and he has ten years on industry experience in the area of fiber optic telecommunication systems and power electronics. His research interests include optical communications and power electronics. He has a MS and BS degrees in Electrical Engineering from the University of Florida and a PhD in from the Florida Institute of Technology.

 

 

Abstract:

The primary objective of this paper is to present the design and optimization of a power converter for a hybrid wind-solar energy conversion system with an implementation of Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT). The power converter can transfer the power from a wind generator and photovoltaic panel and improve the safety and stability of the hybrid system. This system design consists of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator (PMSG), a full wave AC-DC bridge rectifier, a DC-DC boost converter, a bidirectional DC-DC converter, and a full bridge DC-AC inverter. The wind generator and the photovoltaic panel are used as the primary power sources of the system, and a battery is used for energy storage and to compensate for the irregularity of the power sources. This paper also presents the structure of the beginning rectifier stage for the hybrid wind- solar energy power conversion system. This structure thereby provides two energy sources simultaneously yet independently, according to their respective availability. The rectifier stage fosters the maximum from wind and solar energy when an adaptive MPPT algorithm is used in the system. The analysis for the system will be discussed in this paper and will give an introduction to the design of the hybrid wind/solar converter circuit.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Bjørn Kvamme has obtained his MSc in Chemical Engineering (1981) and PhD in Chemical Engineering (1984) from the Norwegian University of Technology and Natural Sciences. After a short period with SINTEF and two years at Bergen University College, he was appointed as Full Professor in 1987 and started education of MSc and PhD in Process Technology in Telemark. He has appointed as a Professor in Gas Processing at the Department of Physics, University of Bergen in March 2000. He is the author/co-author of 445 publications during last 15 years, of which 154 are in good international scientific journals. He has 2526 citations as per Feb 1, 2018 and has presented numerous papers at international conferences

Abstract:

Natural gas hydrates are crystalline structures of water and CH4, containing up to 14% CH4. These hydrate structures are distributed all over the world in permafrost regions or in deep offshore sediments and may contain as much as twice the amounts of all other known reserves of conventional fossil fuels. CO2 hydrate is more stable than CH4 hydrate over most regions of temperature and pressure and mixed hydrate in which CH4 fills part of the structure (the 25% small cavities in the structure) is more stable than CH4 hydrate over all conditions of temperature and pressure. Injection of CO2 into natural gas hydrates will therefore lead to release of CH4 for energy while at the same time storing CO2 in solid form. Steam cracking of the produced CH4 over to hydrogen and CO2 gives the option of a zero-emission cycle for producing energy. Experiments, as well as theoretical aspects of the concept are discussed in detail. Technical solutions for the various stages of the cycle is also presented and discussed. Special focus is on the various mechanisms for the conversions and how to optimize the concept

Zeynep Zaimoglu

Cukurova University, Turkey

Title: The conversion between the EU and Turkey energy policies

Time : 16:45-17:05

Speaker
Biography:

Zeynep Zaimoglu has earned her PhD in the field of Agricultural Structures and İrrigation at Cukurova University, Adana, Turkey. She has published, in English and Turkish languages, more than 40 international and national articles as well as two educational textbooks. Her expertise includes watershed management, water resources development, constructed wetlands and water treatment in constructed wetlands, soil and ground water pollution and renewable energy and climate change issues. She is an ERA-NET on Sustainable Animal Production evaluation committee. She is currently Professor at Cukurova University since 2013 and engaged extensively in teaching and leading research projects

Abstract:

Energy, which is one of the basic indicators of social development, the socio-political approaches which developed from supply to demand change and this change also effects the policies of the countries, effects also global warming and environmental pollution. These new political approaches cannot be ignored. In this context, EU and Turkey have created energy policies in which renewable energy sources are supported to combat environmental pollution. Turkey while trying to take place in this changing conjuncture, so many efforts have been made to acquire renewable energy resources on the basis of energy diversity and to take a place in the world energy sector by taking steps on energy saving and efficiency fields. Also Turkey has begun liberalization of the energy market structure, just as it is in EU and start to pursue a strong and transparent policy by opening it to the competitive financial market. In this study, strategies about energy policies in Turkey those can be taken as a result of Paris summit are studied. Turkey is making the necessary arrangements in harmony with the renewable energy targets, improving the cooperation with other fossil sources and contributing the effective participation into the national and international studies in order to prevent previous negative effects of the increasing of the energy consumption, prepare a clean environment for the next generations.

 

Tareq Kareri

University of South Florida, USA

Title: Modeling and simulation of an off-grid pv system with a battery storage system

Time : 17:05-17:25

Biography:

Tareq Kareri has completed his MS from Northern Illinois University School of Engineerin. He is pursuing his education by studying the PhD program at University of South Florida School of Engineering.

 

Abstract:

Many parts of remote areas in the world are not connected to the electrical grid even with current advanced technology. Photovoltaic energy systems (PV) are very suitable and effective solution to supply electricity to remote and isolated areas. Furthermore, in order to meet the needs of the consumers, these systems should be connected to a battery storage system, especially for off-grid systems, to supply electricity at night. This paper focuses on the modeling, analysis, and simulation of a PV energy system with battery storage system. The PV energy system is used as a primary energy system, and the battery storage system is used as a backup energy system. The battery storage system is applied to store extra power from PV system and to supply continuous power to load when the PV system power is less than load power. A bidirectional DC-DC converter controlled by a fuzzy logic controller (FLC) is used to manage and regulate the energy system. A control technique, which is maximum power point tracking (MPPT), has been applied to capture the maximum power point from the PV energy system. A DC-DC converter is applied with MPPT controller to reduce losses in the PV system. The photovoltaic energy system is studied under changing environmental conditions. MATLAB/Simulink software is used to model, simulate, and analyze the entire PV/battery system.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Bjørn Kvamme has obtained his MSc in Chemical Engineering (1981) and PhD in Chemical Engineering (1984) from the Norwegian University of Technology and Natural Sciences. After a short period with SINTEF and two years at Bergen University College, he was appointed as full Professor in 1987 and started education of MSc and PhD in Process Technology in Telemark. He is appointed as a Professor in Gas Processing at the Department of Physics, University of Bergen in March 2000. He is the author/co-author of 445 publications during last 15 years, of which 154 are in good international scientific journals. He has 2526 citations as per Feb 1, 2018, and has presented numerous papers at international conferences.

 

Abstract:

Worldwide there are huge amounts of methane trapped in water as hydrate. These ice-like hydrate crystals contains up to 14% methane in a highly concentrated form. Unlike conventional oil and gas, hydrates are spread all over the world in permafrost region or deep offshore sediments. Many countries depend on import of fossil fuel and in many cases on various qualities of contaminating coal. Simple and inexpensive ways to produce these hydrates are available and in this work we demonstrate by state of the art reservoir modeling of some of these production methods. This includes pressure reduction as well as replacement of CH4 hydrate by CO2 hydrate. The latter option is discussed in more details since it represents an interesting concept for CO2 utilization and safe long terms storage of CO2. Injection of pure CO2 in natural gas hydrates involves low permeability and rapid formation of new hydrate than can block the sediments. Various ways to modify the concept by addition of other gases as well as environmentally friendly surfactants are discussed. Results from reservoir simulations related to real hydrate reservoirs are presented. These hydrate reservoirs span the range from shallow hydrate reservoir in the Barents Sea to very deep reservoirs offshore Taiwan.